Abstract

The use of fiber materials span from building construction, racing and automotive industry, over space travel, to clothing and filters for water and air cleaning. Different transport parameters are important for the different applications. In construction, thermal conductivity is an essential parameter for insulation, and a deeper insight in the transport properties of heat through a fiber matrix could be beneficial. This study presents a concept for fiber media characterization by merging thermal measurements with pore-network measurements. Four different material characterization methods were combined. First, the microstructure was characterized, and then thermal conductivity, air permeability, and water content measurements were combined for three different fiber materials: Rockwool insulation fibers, Kevlar reinforcement fibers and electrospun polyester fibers. Kevlar exhibits by far the largest moisture sorption capability. All three materials showed very different thermal and convective air flow characteristics as function of volume content of solids. A general behavior is observed where a threshold volume content of solids changed both the air permeability and the thermal conductivity characteristics. For Rockwool and Kevlar, the combined measurements and air flow modelling all implied that the threshold for both thermal conductivity and air permeability are interconnected. These findings suggest that a change in the microstructure occurs at compression, having an impact on both the transport in the open network as well as the thermal transport in the solid fibers.
Original languageEnglish
JournalEnergy and Buildings
ISSN0378-7788
Publication statusIn preparation - 2019

Fingerprint

Moisture
Fibers
Air permeability
Air
Thermal conductivity
Insulation
Racing automobiles
Microstructure
Fiber reinforced materials
Hot Temperature
Automotive industry
Merging
Transport properties
Water content
Sorption
Polyesters
Cleaning
Water

Keywords

  • Thermal conductivity
  • Moisture dynamics
  • Fiber materials
  • Air permeability
  • Volume content of solids
  • Water active surface area

Cite this

@article{563905486e7f4702b058527fb111a957,
title = "Thermal, Air, and Moisture Characteristics of Differently-Compacted Fiber Materials",
abstract = "The use of fiber materials span from building construction, racing and automotive industry, over space travel, to clothing and filters for water and air cleaning. Different transport parameters are important for the different applications. In construction, thermal conductivity is an essential parameter for insulation, and a deeper insight in the transport properties of heat through a fiber matrix could be beneficial. This study presents a concept for fiber media characterization by merging thermal measurements with pore-network measurements. Four different material characterization methods were combined. First, the microstructure was characterized, and then thermal conductivity, air permeability, and water content measurements were combined for three different fiber materials: Rockwool insulation fibers, Kevlar reinforcement fibers and electrospun polyester fibers. Kevlar exhibits by far the largest moisture sorption capability. All three materials showed very different thermal and convective air flow characteristics as function of volume content of solids. A general behavior is observed where a threshold volume content of solids changed both the air permeability and the thermal conductivity characteristics. For Rockwool and Kevlar, the combined measurements and air flow modelling all implied that the threshold for both thermal conductivity and air permeability are interconnected. These findings suggest that a change in the microstructure occurs at compression, having an impact on both the transport in the open network as well as the thermal transport in the solid fibers.",
keywords = "Thermal conductivity, Moisture dynamics, Fiber materials, Air permeability, Volume content of solids, Water active surface area",
author = "Lasse Christiansen and Antonov, {Yovko Ivanov} and Jensen, {Rasmus Lund} and Emmanuel Arthur and {de Jonge}, {Lis Wollesen} and Per M{\o}ldrup and Peter Fojan",
year = "2019",
language = "English",
journal = "Energy and Buildings",
issn = "0378-7788",
publisher = "Elsevier",

}

Thermal, Air, and Moisture Characteristics of Differently-Compacted Fiber Materials. / Christiansen, Lasse; Antonov, Yovko Ivanov; Jensen, Rasmus Lund; Arthur, Emmanuel; de Jonge, Lis Wollesen; Møldrup, Per; Fojan, Peter.

In: Energy and Buildings, 2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Thermal, Air, and Moisture Characteristics of Differently-Compacted Fiber Materials

AU - Christiansen, Lasse

AU - Antonov, Yovko Ivanov

AU - Jensen, Rasmus Lund

AU - Arthur, Emmanuel

AU - de Jonge, Lis Wollesen

AU - Møldrup, Per

AU - Fojan, Peter

PY - 2019

Y1 - 2019

N2 - The use of fiber materials span from building construction, racing and automotive industry, over space travel, to clothing and filters for water and air cleaning. Different transport parameters are important for the different applications. In construction, thermal conductivity is an essential parameter for insulation, and a deeper insight in the transport properties of heat through a fiber matrix could be beneficial. This study presents a concept for fiber media characterization by merging thermal measurements with pore-network measurements. Four different material characterization methods were combined. First, the microstructure was characterized, and then thermal conductivity, air permeability, and water content measurements were combined for three different fiber materials: Rockwool insulation fibers, Kevlar reinforcement fibers and electrospun polyester fibers. Kevlar exhibits by far the largest moisture sorption capability. All three materials showed very different thermal and convective air flow characteristics as function of volume content of solids. A general behavior is observed where a threshold volume content of solids changed both the air permeability and the thermal conductivity characteristics. For Rockwool and Kevlar, the combined measurements and air flow modelling all implied that the threshold for both thermal conductivity and air permeability are interconnected. These findings suggest that a change in the microstructure occurs at compression, having an impact on both the transport in the open network as well as the thermal transport in the solid fibers.

AB - The use of fiber materials span from building construction, racing and automotive industry, over space travel, to clothing and filters for water and air cleaning. Different transport parameters are important for the different applications. In construction, thermal conductivity is an essential parameter for insulation, and a deeper insight in the transport properties of heat through a fiber matrix could be beneficial. This study presents a concept for fiber media characterization by merging thermal measurements with pore-network measurements. Four different material characterization methods were combined. First, the microstructure was characterized, and then thermal conductivity, air permeability, and water content measurements were combined for three different fiber materials: Rockwool insulation fibers, Kevlar reinforcement fibers and electrospun polyester fibers. Kevlar exhibits by far the largest moisture sorption capability. All three materials showed very different thermal and convective air flow characteristics as function of volume content of solids. A general behavior is observed where a threshold volume content of solids changed both the air permeability and the thermal conductivity characteristics. For Rockwool and Kevlar, the combined measurements and air flow modelling all implied that the threshold for both thermal conductivity and air permeability are interconnected. These findings suggest that a change in the microstructure occurs at compression, having an impact on both the transport in the open network as well as the thermal transport in the solid fibers.

KW - Thermal conductivity

KW - Moisture dynamics

KW - Fiber materials

KW - Air permeability

KW - Volume content of solids

KW - Water active surface area

M3 - Journal article

JO - Energy and Buildings

JF - Energy and Buildings

SN - 0378-7788

ER -