Using Wireless Network Coding to Replace a Wired with Wireless Backhaul

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4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cellular networks are evolving towards dense deployment of small cells, which requires flexible and efficient backhauling solutions. A viable solution that reuses the same spectrum is wireless backhaul where the Small Base Station (SBS) acts as a relay. In this paper we consider a reference system that uses wired backhaul and each Mobile Station (MS) in the small cell has its uplink and downlink rates defined. The central question is: if we remove the wired backhaul, how much extra power should the wireless backhaul use in order to support the same uplink/downlink rates? We introduce the idea of wireless emulated wire (WEW), based on two-way relaying and network coding. This setup leads to a new type of broadcast problem, with decoding conditions that are specific to the requirement for equivalence to the wired backhaul. We formulate and solve the associated optimization problems. The proposed approach is a convincing argument that wireless backhauling solutions should
be designed and optimized for two-way communication.
Original languageEnglish
JournalI E E E Wireless Communications Letters
Volume4
Issue number2
Pages (from-to)141-144
ISSN2162-2337
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 30 Dec 2014

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Network coding
Wireless networks
Base stations
Decoding
Wire
Communication

Cite this

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title = "Using Wireless Network Coding to Replace a Wired with Wireless Backhaul",
abstract = "Cellular networks are evolving towards dense deployment of small cells, which requires flexible and efficient backhauling solutions. A viable solution that reuses the same spectrum is wireless backhaul where the Small Base Station (SBS) acts as a relay. In this paper we consider a reference system that uses wired backhaul and each Mobile Station (MS) in the small cell has its uplink and downlink rates defined. The central question is: if we remove the wired backhaul, how much extra power should the wireless backhaul use in order to support the same uplink/downlink rates? We introduce the idea of wireless emulated wire (WEW), based on two-way relaying and network coding. This setup leads to a new type of broadcast problem, with decoding conditions that are specific to the requirement for equivalence to the wired backhaul. We formulate and solve the associated optimization problems. The proposed approach is a convincing argument that wireless backhauling solutions shouldbe designed and optimized for two-way communication.",
author = "Henning Thomsen and {De Carvalho}, Elisabeth and Petar Popovski",
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doi = "10.1109/LWC.2014.2386857",
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Using Wireless Network Coding to Replace a Wired with Wireless Backhaul. / Thomsen, Henning; De Carvalho, Elisabeth; Popovski, Petar.

In: I E E E Wireless Communications Letters, Vol. 4, No. 2, 30.12.2014, p. 141-144.

Research output: Contribution to journalLetterResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Using Wireless Network Coding to Replace a Wired with Wireless Backhaul

AU - Thomsen, Henning

AU - De Carvalho, Elisabeth

AU - Popovski, Petar

PY - 2014/12/30

Y1 - 2014/12/30

N2 - Cellular networks are evolving towards dense deployment of small cells, which requires flexible and efficient backhauling solutions. A viable solution that reuses the same spectrum is wireless backhaul where the Small Base Station (SBS) acts as a relay. In this paper we consider a reference system that uses wired backhaul and each Mobile Station (MS) in the small cell has its uplink and downlink rates defined. The central question is: if we remove the wired backhaul, how much extra power should the wireless backhaul use in order to support the same uplink/downlink rates? We introduce the idea of wireless emulated wire (WEW), based on two-way relaying and network coding. This setup leads to a new type of broadcast problem, with decoding conditions that are specific to the requirement for equivalence to the wired backhaul. We formulate and solve the associated optimization problems. The proposed approach is a convincing argument that wireless backhauling solutions shouldbe designed and optimized for two-way communication.

AB - Cellular networks are evolving towards dense deployment of small cells, which requires flexible and efficient backhauling solutions. A viable solution that reuses the same spectrum is wireless backhaul where the Small Base Station (SBS) acts as a relay. In this paper we consider a reference system that uses wired backhaul and each Mobile Station (MS) in the small cell has its uplink and downlink rates defined. The central question is: if we remove the wired backhaul, how much extra power should the wireless backhaul use in order to support the same uplink/downlink rates? We introduce the idea of wireless emulated wire (WEW), based on two-way relaying and network coding. This setup leads to a new type of broadcast problem, with decoding conditions that are specific to the requirement for equivalence to the wired backhaul. We formulate and solve the associated optimization problems. The proposed approach is a convincing argument that wireless backhauling solutions shouldbe designed and optimized for two-way communication.

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