“We are not free, admit it... but we cling onto tomorrow”: Imagination as a Tool for Coping in Disempowering Situations

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Abstract

This chapter discusses the role of imagination as a higher mental function that facilitates coping in disempowering social settings. It builds on Carlos Cornejo’s (this volume) account on the cultural history of imagination and the development of the concept from that of delusion to that of reason and intellect. The focus will be on how imagination is essential to humans’ adaptation through the life course, looking at the capacity to temporarily disengage from what is and imagine what might be and its implication on coping and resilience. The topic will be discussed using empirical data from the social context of Egypt post 2011 revolution looking at how imagination is expressed in letters written by political prisoners.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationThe Psychology of Imagination: History, Theory and New Research Horizons
EditorsBrady Wagoner, Ignacio Brescó de Luna, Sarah H. Awad
PublisherInformation Age Publishing
Publication date2017
Pages267-281
Chapter14
ISBN (Print)978-1-68123-710-7, 978-1-68123-709-1
ISBN (Electronic)978-1-68123-711-4
Publication statusPublished - 2017
SeriesNiels Bohr Professorship Lectures in Cultural Psychology
Volume3

Keywords

  • Imagination
  • Coping
  • Revolution

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    Awad, S. H. (2017). “We are not free, admit it... but we cling onto tomorrow”: Imagination as a Tool for Coping in Disempowering Situations. In B. Wagoner, I. Brescó de Luna, & S. H. Awad (Eds.), The Psychology of Imagination: : History, Theory and New Research Horizons (pp. 267-281). Information Age Publishing. Niels Bohr Professorship Lectures in Cultural Psychology Vol. 3