What is the strongest predictor of birth weight: Gestational age, hbalc, maternal weight, weight gain, or birth weight of sibling?

Gunnar Lauge Nielsen, Claus Dethlefsen

Research output: Contribution to conference without publisher/journalPosterResearch

Abstract

Aim: To assess the effect of various maternal characteristics in diabetic pregnancies on birthweight (BW) taking into account birthweight of an elderly sibling.  Method: We identified all pregnant diabetic women in North Jutland County. Birthweight and certain maternal characteristics including HbA1c values after 20th gestational week were collected. Multiple regression models were fitted to assess the effect various predictors of birthweight in both entire cohort (n=501) and in a subset with available weight of sibling (n=139). Sibling weight was calculated as relative to expected weight adjusted for age and sex using a Danish reference. E.g. an observed sibling weight of 3800 g with expected BW 3400 g predicts 11.8% extra weight equal to 134 grams (114x11.8) and one extra gestational day predicts an additional weight of 27 grams.  Results: The effects in terms of additional grams in BW for various increments in each of the 9 variables are seen in the table. All significant values are in bold face.  Conclusion: Weight of sibling is a very strong predictor of birthweight attenuating the predictive power of all other variablesapart from gestational age.
Original languageEnglish
Publication date2007
Publication statusPublished - 2007
EventInternational Symposium on Diabetes and Pregnancy - Instanbul, Turkey
Duration: 29 Mar 200731 Mar 2007
Conference number: 4

Conference

ConferenceInternational Symposium on Diabetes and Pregnancy
Number4
CountryTurkey
CityInstanbul
Period29/03/200731/03/2007

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Birth Weight
Gestational Age
Weight Gain
Siblings
Mothers
Weights and Measures
Pregnancy in Diabetics
Pregnant Women

Cite this

Nielsen, G. L., & Dethlefsen, C. (2007). What is the strongest predictor of birth weight: Gestational age, hbalc, maternal weight, weight gain, or birth weight of sibling?. Poster session presented at International Symposium on Diabetes and Pregnancy, Instanbul, Turkey.
Nielsen, Gunnar Lauge ; Dethlefsen, Claus. / What is the strongest predictor of birth weight: Gestational age, hbalc, maternal weight, weight gain, or birth weight of sibling?. Poster session presented at International Symposium on Diabetes and Pregnancy, Instanbul, Turkey.
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What is the strongest predictor of birth weight: Gestational age, hbalc, maternal weight, weight gain, or birth weight of sibling? / Nielsen, Gunnar Lauge; Dethlefsen, Claus.

2007. Poster session presented at International Symposium on Diabetes and Pregnancy, Instanbul, Turkey.

Research output: Contribution to conference without publisher/journalPosterResearch

TY - CONF

T1 - What is the strongest predictor of birth weight: Gestational age, hbalc, maternal weight, weight gain, or birth weight of sibling?

AU - Nielsen, Gunnar Lauge

AU - Dethlefsen, Claus

PY - 2007

Y1 - 2007

N2 - Aim: To assess the effect of various maternal characteristics in diabetic pregnancies on birthweight (BW) taking into account birthweight of an elderly sibling.  Method: We identified all pregnant diabetic women in North Jutland County. Birthweight and certain maternal characteristics including HbA1c values after 20th gestational week were collected. Multiple regression models were fitted to assess the effect various predictors of birthweight in both entire cohort (n=501) and in a subset with available weight of sibling (n=139). Sibling weight was calculated as relative to expected weight adjusted for age and sex using a Danish reference. E.g. an observed sibling weight of 3800 g with expected BW 3400 g predicts 11.8% extra weight equal to 134 grams (114x11.8) and one extra gestational day predicts an additional weight of 27 grams.  Results: The effects in terms of additional grams in BW for various increments in each of the 9 variables are seen in the table. All significant values are in bold face.  Conclusion: Weight of sibling is a very strong predictor of birthweight attenuating the predictive power of all other variablesapart from gestational age.

AB - Aim: To assess the effect of various maternal characteristics in diabetic pregnancies on birthweight (BW) taking into account birthweight of an elderly sibling.  Method: We identified all pregnant diabetic women in North Jutland County. Birthweight and certain maternal characteristics including HbA1c values after 20th gestational week were collected. Multiple regression models were fitted to assess the effect various predictors of birthweight in both entire cohort (n=501) and in a subset with available weight of sibling (n=139). Sibling weight was calculated as relative to expected weight adjusted for age and sex using a Danish reference. E.g. an observed sibling weight of 3800 g with expected BW 3400 g predicts 11.8% extra weight equal to 134 grams (114x11.8) and one extra gestational day predicts an additional weight of 27 grams.  Results: The effects in terms of additional grams in BW for various increments in each of the 9 variables are seen in the table. All significant values are in bold face.  Conclusion: Weight of sibling is a very strong predictor of birthweight attenuating the predictive power of all other variablesapart from gestational age.

M3 - Poster

ER -

Nielsen GL, Dethlefsen C. What is the strongest predictor of birth weight: Gestational age, hbalc, maternal weight, weight gain, or birth weight of sibling?. 2007. Poster session presented at International Symposium on Diabetes and Pregnancy, Instanbul, Turkey.