What modulate attentional parameters, familiarity or features?

Thomas Alrik Sørensen, Yongming Wang, Xinlu Cai, Raymond C.K. Chan, Jonas Olsen Dall

Research output: Contribution to journalConference abstract in journalResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Several studies have investigated object-based capacity limitations of visual short-term memory (VSTM) (e.g. Luck & Vogel, 1997; Alvarez & Cavanagh, 2004). Recently research interest has turned from object-based processing towards the resolution of objects retained in short-term memory (e.g. Wilken & Ma, 2004). Although this research is highly relevant, there may be an inherent difference whether a stimulus can be easily classified in a discrete category, or if it belongs on a spectrum of a continuous category.Previous studies have shown that object based capacity of VSTM is not only limited by object complexity as argued by Alvarez & Cavanagh (2004), but also relates to familiarity and expertise (Sørensen & Kyllingsbæk, 2012; Dall, Watanabe, & Sørensen, 2016). Here we investigated the influence of two vectors of complexity, namely the number of features that the constitute an object versus the degree of familiarity with said object.We presented Chinese observers with a whole report design (see Sperling, 1960), consisting of four stimulus conditions. Chinese characters varied along two aspects: the word frequency and the number of strokes used in the character. Data were analysed using the Theory of Visual Attention (Bundesen, 1990) enabling us to isolate specific components of attention; VSTM capacity (K), as well as parameters like processing speed (C), and the threshold for visual perception (t0) (e.g. Ásgeirsson, Nordfang & Sørensen, 2015).The threshold of visual perception was not affected by the manipulation of stroke count, nor by character frequency. In turn we found a consistent pattern in both processing speed and capacity of VSTM revealing that observer performance was driven mainly by familiarity, and not stroke count, demonstrating that object complexity is dependent on the robustness of an observer’s mental categories, rather than on the number of features in the object per se.
Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Vision
Volume17
Issue number10
ISSN1534-7362
Publication statusPublished - 4 Sep 2017
EventVision Sciences Society Annual Meeting - TradeWinds Island Resorts, St. Pete Beach, Florida, United States
Duration: 19 May 201724 May 2017
Conference number: 16
http://www.visionsciences.org/
http://www.visionsciences.org/

Conference

ConferenceVision Sciences Society Annual Meeting
Number16
LocationTradeWinds Island Resorts
CountryUnited States
CitySt. Pete Beach, Florida
Period19/05/201724/05/2017
Internet address

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Short-Term Memory
Visual Perception
Stroke
Research
Recognition (Psychology)

Cite this

Sørensen, T. A., Wang, Y., Cai, X., Chan, R. C. K., & Dall, J. O. (2017). What modulate attentional parameters, familiarity or features? Journal of Vision, 17(10).
Sørensen, Thomas Alrik ; Wang, Yongming ; Cai, Xinlu ; Chan, Raymond C.K. ; Dall, Jonas Olsen. / What modulate attentional parameters, familiarity or features?. In: Journal of Vision. 2017 ; Vol. 17, No. 10.
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title = "What modulate attentional parameters, familiarity or features?",
abstract = "Several studies have investigated object-based capacity limitations of visual short-term memory (VSTM) (e.g. Luck & Vogel, 1997; Alvarez & Cavanagh, 2004). Recently research interest has turned from object-based processing towards the resolution of objects retained in short-term memory (e.g. Wilken & Ma, 2004). Although this research is highly relevant, there may be an inherent difference whether a stimulus can be easily classified in a discrete category, or if it belongs on a spectrum of a continuous category.Previous studies have shown that object based capacity of VSTM is not only limited by object complexity as argued by Alvarez & Cavanagh (2004), but also relates to familiarity and expertise (S{\o}rensen & Kyllingsb{\ae}k, 2012; Dall, Watanabe, & S{\o}rensen, 2016). Here we investigated the influence of two vectors of complexity, namely the number of features that the constitute an object versus the degree of familiarity with said object.We presented Chinese observers with a whole report design (see Sperling, 1960), consisting of four stimulus conditions. Chinese characters varied along two aspects: the word frequency and the number of strokes used in the character. Data were analysed using the Theory of Visual Attention (Bundesen, 1990) enabling us to isolate specific components of attention; VSTM capacity (K), as well as parameters like processing speed (C), and the threshold for visual perception (t0) (e.g. Ásgeirsson, Nordfang & S{\o}rensen, 2015).The threshold of visual perception was not affected by the manipulation of stroke count, nor by character frequency. In turn we found a consistent pattern in both processing speed and capacity of VSTM revealing that observer performance was driven mainly by familiarity, and not stroke count, demonstrating that object complexity is dependent on the robustness of an observer’s mental categories, rather than on the number of features in the object per se.",
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Sørensen, TA, Wang, Y, Cai, X, Chan, RCK & Dall, JO 2017, 'What modulate attentional parameters, familiarity or features?', Journal of Vision, vol. 17, no. 10.

What modulate attentional parameters, familiarity or features? / Sørensen, Thomas Alrik; Wang, Yongming; Cai, Xinlu; Chan, Raymond C.K.; Dall, Jonas Olsen.

In: Journal of Vision, Vol. 17, No. 10, 04.09.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalConference abstract in journalResearchpeer-review

TY - ABST

T1 - What modulate attentional parameters, familiarity or features?

AU - Sørensen, Thomas Alrik

AU - Wang, Yongming

AU - Cai, Xinlu

AU - Chan, Raymond C.K.

AU - Dall, Jonas Olsen

PY - 2017/9/4

Y1 - 2017/9/4

N2 - Several studies have investigated object-based capacity limitations of visual short-term memory (VSTM) (e.g. Luck & Vogel, 1997; Alvarez & Cavanagh, 2004). Recently research interest has turned from object-based processing towards the resolution of objects retained in short-term memory (e.g. Wilken & Ma, 2004). Although this research is highly relevant, there may be an inherent difference whether a stimulus can be easily classified in a discrete category, or if it belongs on a spectrum of a continuous category.Previous studies have shown that object based capacity of VSTM is not only limited by object complexity as argued by Alvarez & Cavanagh (2004), but also relates to familiarity and expertise (Sørensen & Kyllingsbæk, 2012; Dall, Watanabe, & Sørensen, 2016). Here we investigated the influence of two vectors of complexity, namely the number of features that the constitute an object versus the degree of familiarity with said object.We presented Chinese observers with a whole report design (see Sperling, 1960), consisting of four stimulus conditions. Chinese characters varied along two aspects: the word frequency and the number of strokes used in the character. Data were analysed using the Theory of Visual Attention (Bundesen, 1990) enabling us to isolate specific components of attention; VSTM capacity (K), as well as parameters like processing speed (C), and the threshold for visual perception (t0) (e.g. Ásgeirsson, Nordfang & Sørensen, 2015).The threshold of visual perception was not affected by the manipulation of stroke count, nor by character frequency. In turn we found a consistent pattern in both processing speed and capacity of VSTM revealing that observer performance was driven mainly by familiarity, and not stroke count, demonstrating that object complexity is dependent on the robustness of an observer’s mental categories, rather than on the number of features in the object per se.

AB - Several studies have investigated object-based capacity limitations of visual short-term memory (VSTM) (e.g. Luck & Vogel, 1997; Alvarez & Cavanagh, 2004). Recently research interest has turned from object-based processing towards the resolution of objects retained in short-term memory (e.g. Wilken & Ma, 2004). Although this research is highly relevant, there may be an inherent difference whether a stimulus can be easily classified in a discrete category, or if it belongs on a spectrum of a continuous category.Previous studies have shown that object based capacity of VSTM is not only limited by object complexity as argued by Alvarez & Cavanagh (2004), but also relates to familiarity and expertise (Sørensen & Kyllingsbæk, 2012; Dall, Watanabe, & Sørensen, 2016). Here we investigated the influence of two vectors of complexity, namely the number of features that the constitute an object versus the degree of familiarity with said object.We presented Chinese observers with a whole report design (see Sperling, 1960), consisting of four stimulus conditions. Chinese characters varied along two aspects: the word frequency and the number of strokes used in the character. Data were analysed using the Theory of Visual Attention (Bundesen, 1990) enabling us to isolate specific components of attention; VSTM capacity (K), as well as parameters like processing speed (C), and the threshold for visual perception (t0) (e.g. Ásgeirsson, Nordfang & Sørensen, 2015).The threshold of visual perception was not affected by the manipulation of stroke count, nor by character frequency. In turn we found a consistent pattern in both processing speed and capacity of VSTM revealing that observer performance was driven mainly by familiarity, and not stroke count, demonstrating that object complexity is dependent on the robustness of an observer’s mental categories, rather than on the number of features in the object per se.

M3 - Conference abstract in journal

VL - 17

JO - Journal of Vision

JF - Journal of Vision

SN - 1534-7362

IS - 10

ER -