Your Light Switch Is Your Vote: Mediating Discourse and Participation in the ‘Vote Earth’ Campaign to Foster Awareness of Anthropogenic Climate Change

    Research output: Contribution to conference without publisher/journalConference abstract for conferenceResearchpeer-review

    Abstract

    This presentation reports on a study of how discourses of environmental citizenship, sustainability and climate change are communicated and mediated in a global media event. “Earth Hour” began in 2007 in Sydney, Australia, and in 2009 it was proclaimed a successful global event. The event focused primarily on citizen awareness, participation and solidarity in mitigating climate change. In its sister campaign (“Vote Earth”), the discourse of representative democracy was deployed to constitute an imaginary global electorate. The analysis focuses on (a) the intense drive to visualise and spectacularise (mediational means) the simple act of switching off the lights and the consequences of such an act; (b) the massive infrastructure of communication to synchronise the collective performance of a global ‘climate public’; (c) the discursive ‘memory work’ to archive and memorialise the hour, eg. on YouTube; and (d) the attempt to inculcate a ‘global citizen’ who is concerned with the environment/climate and whose anticipatory mediated actions in relation to it are prefigured by this communicative event, and (e) the resistance to the circulation of this ‘new’ mediated discourse. The presentation will also reflect on developments that arise as a result of Earth Hour 4 in March 2010.
    Original languageEnglish
    Publication date21 Apr 2010
    Number of pages7
    Publication statusPublished - 21 Apr 2010
    EventRUC Sunrise Triple C Conference: Climate – Change – Communication - Roskilde, Denmark
    Duration: 20 Apr 201022 Apr 2010

    Conference

    ConferenceRUC Sunrise Triple C Conference: Climate – Change – Communication
    CountryDenmark
    CityRoskilde
    Period20/04/201022/04/2010

    Fingerprint

    climate change
    democracy
    global climate
    infrastructure
    sustainability
    communication
    climate
    participation
    citizen
    analysis
    environmental citizenship
    citizen awareness
    public

    Bibliographical note

    A 7 page paper was uploaded to the conference website.

    Keywords

    • climate change
    • campaigns
    • discourse
    • YouTube

    Cite this

    McIlvenny, P. (2010). Your Light Switch Is Your Vote: Mediating Discourse and Participation in the ‘Vote Earth’ Campaign to Foster Awareness of Anthropogenic Climate Change. Abstract from RUC Sunrise Triple C Conference: Climate – Change – Communication, Roskilde, Denmark.
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    abstract = "This presentation reports on a study of how discourses of environmental citizenship, sustainability and climate change are communicated and mediated in a global media event. “Earth Hour” began in 2007 in Sydney, Australia, and in 2009 it was proclaimed a successful global event. The event focused primarily on citizen awareness, participation and solidarity in mitigating climate change. In its sister campaign (“Vote Earth”), the discourse of representative democracy was deployed to constitute an imaginary global electorate. The analysis focuses on (a) the intense drive to visualise and spectacularise (mediational means) the simple act of switching off the lights and the consequences of such an act; (b) the massive infrastructure of communication to synchronise the collective performance of a global ‘climate public’; (c) the discursive ‘memory work’ to archive and memorialise the hour, eg. on YouTube; and (d) the attempt to inculcate a ‘global citizen’ who is concerned with the environment/climate and whose anticipatory mediated actions in relation to it are prefigured by this communicative event, and (e) the resistance to the circulation of this ‘new’ mediated discourse. The presentation will also reflect on developments that arise as a result of Earth Hour 4 in March 2010.",
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    Your Light Switch Is Your Vote : Mediating Discourse and Participation in the ‘Vote Earth’ Campaign to Foster Awareness of Anthropogenic Climate Change. / McIlvenny, Paul.

    2010. Abstract from RUC Sunrise Triple C Conference: Climate – Change – Communication, Roskilde, Denmark.

    Research output: Contribution to conference without publisher/journalConference abstract for conferenceResearchpeer-review

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    AB - This presentation reports on a study of how discourses of environmental citizenship, sustainability and climate change are communicated and mediated in a global media event. “Earth Hour” began in 2007 in Sydney, Australia, and in 2009 it was proclaimed a successful global event. The event focused primarily on citizen awareness, participation and solidarity in mitigating climate change. In its sister campaign (“Vote Earth”), the discourse of representative democracy was deployed to constitute an imaginary global electorate. The analysis focuses on (a) the intense drive to visualise and spectacularise (mediational means) the simple act of switching off the lights and the consequences of such an act; (b) the massive infrastructure of communication to synchronise the collective performance of a global ‘climate public’; (c) the discursive ‘memory work’ to archive and memorialise the hour, eg. on YouTube; and (d) the attempt to inculcate a ‘global citizen’ who is concerned with the environment/climate and whose anticipatory mediated actions in relation to it are prefigured by this communicative event, and (e) the resistance to the circulation of this ‘new’ mediated discourse. The presentation will also reflect on developments that arise as a result of Earth Hour 4 in March 2010.

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    McIlvenny P. Your Light Switch Is Your Vote: Mediating Discourse and Participation in the ‘Vote Earth’ Campaign to Foster Awareness of Anthropogenic Climate Change. 2010. Abstract from RUC Sunrise Triple C Conference: Climate – Change – Communication, Roskilde, Denmark.