Feasibility Study of a Simulation Driven Approach for Estimating Reliability of Wind Turbine Fluid Power Pitch Systems

Research output: Contribution to book/anthology/report/conference proceedingArticle in proceedingResearchpeer-review

104 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Recent field data indicates that pitch systems account for a substantial part of a wind turbines down time. Reducing downtime means increasing the total amount of energy produced during its lifetime. Both electrical and fluid power pitch systems are employed with a roughly 50/50 distribution. Fluid power pitch systems generally show higher reliability and have been favored on larger offshore wind turbines. Still general issues such as leakage, contamination and electrical faults make current systems work sub-optimal. Current field data for wind turbines present overall pitch system reliability and the reliability of component groups (valves, accumulators, pumps etc.). However, the failure modes of the components and more importantly the root causes are not evident. The root causes and failure mode probabilities are central for changing current pitch system designs and operational concepts to increase reliability. This paper presents a feasibility study of estimating pitch system reliability based on a failure rate prediction method for generic fluid power components. Special attention is given to the use of computer simulations for assessing working conditions such as flow, pressure, work cycle, fluid contamination concentration etc. The fluid power pitch system is co-simulated with the 5MW NREL wind turbine implemented in the FAST software. The estimated failure rates is compared to field data and comments are given to the correlation and discrepancies based on the uncertainties of the simulated conditions.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationSafety and Reliability – Safe Societies in a Changing World : Proceedings of the 28th International European Safety and Reliability Conference (ESREL 2018), Trondheim, Norway, 17–21 June 2018
EditorsStein Haugen, Anne Barros, Coen van Gulijk, Trond Kongsvik, Jan Erik Vinnem
Number of pages8
PublisherCRC Press/Balkema
Publication dateJun 2018
Edition1
Pages2037-2044
Chapter256
ISBN (Print)978-0-8153-8682-7
ISBN (Electronic)978-1-3511-7465-7, 978-1-351-17466-4
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2018
EventEuropean Safety and Reliability Conference 2018: ESREL 2018 - Norwegian University of Science and Technology, NTNU, Trondheim, Norway
Duration: 17 Jun 201821 Jun 2018

Conference

ConferenceEuropean Safety and Reliability Conference 2018
LocationNorwegian University of Science and Technology, NTNU
CountryNorway
CityTrondheim
Period17/06/201821/06/2018

Fingerprint

Wind turbines
Fluids
Failure modes
Contamination
Offshore wind turbines
Systems analysis
Pumps
Computer simulation

Cite this

Liniger, J., N. Soltani, M., Pedersen, H. C., & Sepehri, N. (2018). Feasibility Study of a Simulation Driven Approach for Estimating Reliability of Wind Turbine Fluid Power Pitch Systems. In S. Haugen, A. Barros, C. van Gulijk, T. Kongsvik, & J. E. Vinnem (Eds.), Safety and Reliability – Safe Societies in a Changing World: Proceedings of the 28th International European Safety and Reliability Conference (ESREL 2018), Trondheim, Norway, 17–21 June 2018 (1 ed., pp. 2037-2044). CRC Press/Balkema.
Liniger, Jesper ; N. Soltani, Mohsen ; Pedersen, Henrik Clemmensen ; Sepehri, Nariman. / Feasibility Study of a Simulation Driven Approach for Estimating Reliability of Wind Turbine Fluid Power Pitch Systems. Safety and Reliability – Safe Societies in a Changing World: Proceedings of the 28th International European Safety and Reliability Conference (ESREL 2018), Trondheim, Norway, 17–21 June 2018. editor / Stein Haugen ; Anne Barros ; Coen van Gulijk ; Trond Kongsvik ; Jan Erik Vinnem. 1. ed. CRC Press/Balkema, 2018. pp. 2037-2044
@inproceedings{c848e1121bae441582e542cdac16c55a,
title = "Feasibility Study of a Simulation Driven Approach for Estimating Reliability of Wind Turbine Fluid Power Pitch Systems",
abstract = "Recent field data indicates that pitch systems account for a substantial part of a wind turbines down time. Reducing downtime means increasing the total amount of energy produced during its lifetime. Both electrical and fluid power pitch systems are employed with a roughly 50/50 distribution. Fluid power pitch systems generally show higher reliability and have been favored on larger offshore wind turbines. Still general issues such as leakage, contamination and electrical faults make current systems work sub-optimal. Current field data for wind turbines present overall pitch system reliability and the reliability of component groups (valves, accumulators, pumps etc.). However, the failure modes of the components and more importantly the root causes are not evident. The root causes and failure mode probabilities are central for changing current pitch system designs and operational concepts to increase reliability. This paper presents a feasibility study of estimating pitch system reliability based on a failure rate prediction method for generic fluid power components. Special attention is given to the use of computer simulations for assessing working conditions such as flow, pressure, work cycle, fluid contamination concentration etc. The fluid power pitch system is co-simulated with the 5MW NREL wind turbine implemented in the FAST software. The estimated failure rates is compared to field data and comments are given to the correlation and discrepancies based on the uncertainties of the simulated conditions.",
author = "Jesper Liniger and {N. Soltani}, Mohsen and Pedersen, {Henrik Clemmensen} and Nariman Sepehri",
year = "2018",
month = "6",
language = "English",
isbn = "978-0-8153-8682-7",
pages = "2037--2044",
editor = "Stein Haugen and Anne Barros and {van Gulijk}, Coen and Trond Kongsvik and Vinnem, {Jan Erik}",
booktitle = "Safety and Reliability – Safe Societies in a Changing World",
publisher = "CRC Press/Balkema",
edition = "1",

}

Liniger, J, N. Soltani, M, Pedersen, HC & Sepehri, N 2018, Feasibility Study of a Simulation Driven Approach for Estimating Reliability of Wind Turbine Fluid Power Pitch Systems. in S Haugen, A Barros, C van Gulijk, T Kongsvik & JE Vinnem (eds), Safety and Reliability – Safe Societies in a Changing World: Proceedings of the 28th International European Safety and Reliability Conference (ESREL 2018), Trondheim, Norway, 17–21 June 2018. 1 edn, CRC Press/Balkema, pp. 2037-2044, European Safety and Reliability Conference 2018, Trondheim, Norway, 17/06/2018.

Feasibility Study of a Simulation Driven Approach for Estimating Reliability of Wind Turbine Fluid Power Pitch Systems. / Liniger, Jesper; N. Soltani, Mohsen; Pedersen, Henrik Clemmensen; Sepehri, Nariman.

Safety and Reliability – Safe Societies in a Changing World: Proceedings of the 28th International European Safety and Reliability Conference (ESREL 2018), Trondheim, Norway, 17–21 June 2018. ed. / Stein Haugen; Anne Barros; Coen van Gulijk; Trond Kongsvik; Jan Erik Vinnem. 1. ed. CRC Press/Balkema, 2018. p. 2037-2044.

Research output: Contribution to book/anthology/report/conference proceedingArticle in proceedingResearchpeer-review

TY - GEN

T1 - Feasibility Study of a Simulation Driven Approach for Estimating Reliability of Wind Turbine Fluid Power Pitch Systems

AU - Liniger, Jesper

AU - N. Soltani, Mohsen

AU - Pedersen, Henrik Clemmensen

AU - Sepehri, Nariman

PY - 2018/6

Y1 - 2018/6

N2 - Recent field data indicates that pitch systems account for a substantial part of a wind turbines down time. Reducing downtime means increasing the total amount of energy produced during its lifetime. Both electrical and fluid power pitch systems are employed with a roughly 50/50 distribution. Fluid power pitch systems generally show higher reliability and have been favored on larger offshore wind turbines. Still general issues such as leakage, contamination and electrical faults make current systems work sub-optimal. Current field data for wind turbines present overall pitch system reliability and the reliability of component groups (valves, accumulators, pumps etc.). However, the failure modes of the components and more importantly the root causes are not evident. The root causes and failure mode probabilities are central for changing current pitch system designs and operational concepts to increase reliability. This paper presents a feasibility study of estimating pitch system reliability based on a failure rate prediction method for generic fluid power components. Special attention is given to the use of computer simulations for assessing working conditions such as flow, pressure, work cycle, fluid contamination concentration etc. The fluid power pitch system is co-simulated with the 5MW NREL wind turbine implemented in the FAST software. The estimated failure rates is compared to field data and comments are given to the correlation and discrepancies based on the uncertainties of the simulated conditions.

AB - Recent field data indicates that pitch systems account for a substantial part of a wind turbines down time. Reducing downtime means increasing the total amount of energy produced during its lifetime. Both electrical and fluid power pitch systems are employed with a roughly 50/50 distribution. Fluid power pitch systems generally show higher reliability and have been favored on larger offshore wind turbines. Still general issues such as leakage, contamination and electrical faults make current systems work sub-optimal. Current field data for wind turbines present overall pitch system reliability and the reliability of component groups (valves, accumulators, pumps etc.). However, the failure modes of the components and more importantly the root causes are not evident. The root causes and failure mode probabilities are central for changing current pitch system designs and operational concepts to increase reliability. This paper presents a feasibility study of estimating pitch system reliability based on a failure rate prediction method for generic fluid power components. Special attention is given to the use of computer simulations for assessing working conditions such as flow, pressure, work cycle, fluid contamination concentration etc. The fluid power pitch system is co-simulated with the 5MW NREL wind turbine implemented in the FAST software. The estimated failure rates is compared to field data and comments are given to the correlation and discrepancies based on the uncertainties of the simulated conditions.

UR - https://www.taylorfrancis.com/books/e/9781351174657

M3 - Article in proceeding

SN - 978-0-8153-8682-7

SP - 2037

EP - 2044

BT - Safety and Reliability – Safe Societies in a Changing World

A2 - Haugen, Stein

A2 - Barros, Anne

A2 - van Gulijk, Coen

A2 - Kongsvik, Trond

A2 - Vinnem, Jan Erik

PB - CRC Press/Balkema

ER -

Liniger J, N. Soltani M, Pedersen HC, Sepehri N. Feasibility Study of a Simulation Driven Approach for Estimating Reliability of Wind Turbine Fluid Power Pitch Systems. In Haugen S, Barros A, van Gulijk C, Kongsvik T, Vinnem JE, editors, Safety and Reliability – Safe Societies in a Changing World: Proceedings of the 28th International European Safety and Reliability Conference (ESREL 2018), Trondheim, Norway, 17–21 June 2018. 1 ed. CRC Press/Balkema. 2018. p. 2037-2044