Individual differences in low-frequency noise perception

Christian Sejer Pedersen, Torsten Marquardt

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article in JournalResearchpeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)
526 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Standards on hearing like threshold and equal-loudness-level contours show the normal hearing sensitivity at low frequencies as following smooth slopes. However, recent non-invasive measurements of the forward middle-ear transfer function (FMETF) reveal a "resonance feature" seen as dip and a peak in the FMETF where the slope changes approx. 6 dB/octave (around 40-65 Hz depending on person). The change in slope is attributed to the shunting effect of the helicotrema. A preliminary study has been carried out in order to see if this resonance feature measured objectively is also found in perceptual data. The FMETF was measured for five subjects and an equal-loudness contour (ELC) was measured in a fine frequency grid from 20 Hz to 100 Hz. For two subjects a clear resonance feature was seen in the ELC, but it was not evident in the data for the remaining subjects. This means that some people have a narrow frequency range where they are more sensitive and a narrow range where they are less sensitive compared to the standards. Since the frequency range is subject dependent this could explain why some people are annoyed by a lowfrequency sound that is not audible to other people.
Original languageEnglish
JournalNoise-Con Proceedings
Volume218
Issue number1
Pages (from-to)3553-3560
Number of pages8
ISSN0736-2935
Publication statusPublished - 2009
EventINTER-NOISE 2009, the 38th International Congress and Exposition on Noise Control Engineering - Ottawa, Canada
Duration: 23 Aug 200926 Aug 2009
Conference number: 38

Conference

ConferenceINTER-NOISE 2009, the 38th International Congress and Exposition on Noise Control Engineering
Number38
CountryCanada
CityOttawa
Period23/08/200926/08/2009

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middle ear
loudness
transfer functions
hearing
slopes
low frequencies
frequency ranges
octaves
grids
thresholds
acoustics
sensitivity

Bibliographical note

Paper no. 693

Cite this

Pedersen, Christian Sejer ; Marquardt, Torsten. / Individual differences in low-frequency noise perception. In: Noise-Con Proceedings. 2009 ; Vol. 218, No. 1. pp. 3553-3560.
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title = "Individual differences in low-frequency noise perception",
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Individual differences in low-frequency noise perception. / Pedersen, Christian Sejer; Marquardt, Torsten.

In: Noise-Con Proceedings, Vol. 218, No. 1, 2009, p. 3553-3560.

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article in JournalResearchpeer-review

TY - GEN

T1 - Individual differences in low-frequency noise perception

AU - Pedersen, Christian Sejer

AU - Marquardt, Torsten

N1 - Paper no. 693

PY - 2009

Y1 - 2009

N2 - Standards on hearing like threshold and equal-loudness-level contours show the normal hearing sensitivity at low frequencies as following smooth slopes. However, recent non-invasive measurements of the forward middle-ear transfer function (FMETF) reveal a "resonance feature" seen as dip and a peak in the FMETF where the slope changes approx. 6 dB/octave (around 40-65 Hz depending on person). The change in slope is attributed to the shunting effect of the helicotrema. A preliminary study has been carried out in order to see if this resonance feature measured objectively is also found in perceptual data. The FMETF was measured for five subjects and an equal-loudness contour (ELC) was measured in a fine frequency grid from 20 Hz to 100 Hz. For two subjects a clear resonance feature was seen in the ELC, but it was not evident in the data for the remaining subjects. This means that some people have a narrow frequency range where they are more sensitive and a narrow range where they are less sensitive compared to the standards. Since the frequency range is subject dependent this could explain why some people are annoyed by a lowfrequency sound that is not audible to other people.

AB - Standards on hearing like threshold and equal-loudness-level contours show the normal hearing sensitivity at low frequencies as following smooth slopes. However, recent non-invasive measurements of the forward middle-ear transfer function (FMETF) reveal a "resonance feature" seen as dip and a peak in the FMETF where the slope changes approx. 6 dB/octave (around 40-65 Hz depending on person). The change in slope is attributed to the shunting effect of the helicotrema. A preliminary study has been carried out in order to see if this resonance feature measured objectively is also found in perceptual data. The FMETF was measured for five subjects and an equal-loudness contour (ELC) was measured in a fine frequency grid from 20 Hz to 100 Hz. For two subjects a clear resonance feature was seen in the ELC, but it was not evident in the data for the remaining subjects. This means that some people have a narrow frequency range where they are more sensitive and a narrow range where they are less sensitive compared to the standards. Since the frequency range is subject dependent this could explain why some people are annoyed by a lowfrequency sound that is not audible to other people.

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