Student Learning-Game Designs: Emerging Learning Trajectories

Charlotte Lærke Weitze

Research output: Contribution to book/anthology/report/conference proceedingArticle in proceedingResearchpeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)
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Abstract

This article presents new knowledge about how students can implement
learning and game elements into analogue and digital learning games as a
means of learning and teaching curriculum‐based subject matter. The purpose of the analysis is to identify what learning‐game design elements were used in four learning games created by students, to investigate how these elements were em83 ployed, to determine what learning trajectories emerged in the two digital game tools and to offer reflections and suggestions regarding the learning processes students experienced when building the various learning trajectories for specific learning goals into the digital games. The article examines how specific features in the two digital game tools, Scratch and RGBMaker, afford creation of learning trajectories in various ways, enabling deep learning and gameplay processes for the players of the games. According to the study, the level of complexity of the built‐in learning trajectories in the games was mirrored in the cognitive complexity of the student game designers' learning processes. The article presents four student‐created games that demonstrate a progression in the depth of potential learning experiences. The student learning‐game designers re‐interpreted and used the conceptualised game‐mechanics in the game tools to create complex learning trajectories and engaging gameplay. The analysis can be used to guide teachers on what learning‐game design processes and elements should be supported in order to facilitate deep learning in this teaching and learning approach.
The design‐based research project used qualitative research methods; this included audio‐ and videotaped utterances and observations of the teachers and
students as well as analysis of the students’ paper prototype and digital learning
games. Teachers and adult students from a full‐time upper secondary general
education program at VUC Storstrøm participated in co‐design workshops
through two iterations.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of The 10th European Conference on Games Based Learning : ECGBL 2016
EditorsThomas Connolly, Liz Boyle
Number of pages8
Volume1
Place of PublicationThe University of the West of Scotland Paisley Scotland
PublisherAcademic Conferences and Publishing International
Publication date6 Oct 2016
Edition1
Pages756-764
ISBN (Print)978-1-5108-3029-5
ISBN (Electronic)978‐1‐911218‐10‐4
Publication statusPublished - 6 Oct 2016
Event10th European Conference on Games Based Learning - Paisley, United Kingdom
Duration: 6 Oct 20167 Oct 2016
Conference number: 10
http://www.academic-conferences.org/conferences/ecgbl/

Conference

Conference10th European Conference on Games Based Learning
Number10
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityPaisley
Period06/10/201607/10/2016
Internet address

Fingerprint

learning
student
learning process
teacher
Teaching
qualitative method
research method
qualitative research
research project
knowledge
experience

Keywords

  • Learning Design
  • Students as learning game designers
  • Scratch &RGBMaker
  • constructionism
  • students as learning designers

Cite this

Weitze, C. L. (2016). Student Learning-Game Designs: Emerging Learning Trajectories. In T. Connolly, & L. Boyle (Eds.), Proceedings of The 10th European Conference on Games Based Learning : ECGBL 2016 (1 ed., Vol. 1, pp. 756-764). The University of the West of Scotland Paisley Scotland: Academic Conferences and Publishing International.
Weitze, Charlotte Lærke. / Student Learning-Game Designs : Emerging Learning Trajectories. Proceedings of The 10th European Conference on Games Based Learning : ECGBL 2016. editor / Thomas Connolly ; Liz Boyle. Vol. 1 1. ed. The University of the West of Scotland Paisley Scotland : Academic Conferences and Publishing International, 2016. pp. 756-764
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Weitze, CL 2016, Student Learning-Game Designs: Emerging Learning Trajectories. in T Connolly & L Boyle (eds), Proceedings of The 10th European Conference on Games Based Learning : ECGBL 2016. 1 edn, vol. 1, Academic Conferences and Publishing International, The University of the West of Scotland Paisley Scotland, pp. 756-764, 10th European Conference on Games Based Learning , Paisley, United Kingdom, 06/10/2016.

Student Learning-Game Designs : Emerging Learning Trajectories. / Weitze, Charlotte Lærke.

Proceedings of The 10th European Conference on Games Based Learning : ECGBL 2016. ed. / Thomas Connolly; Liz Boyle. Vol. 1 1. ed. The University of the West of Scotland Paisley Scotland : Academic Conferences and Publishing International, 2016. p. 756-764.

Research output: Contribution to book/anthology/report/conference proceedingArticle in proceedingResearchpeer-review

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Weitze CL. Student Learning-Game Designs: Emerging Learning Trajectories. In Connolly T, Boyle L, editors, Proceedings of The 10th European Conference on Games Based Learning : ECGBL 2016. 1 ed. Vol. 1. The University of the West of Scotland Paisley Scotland: Academic Conferences and Publishing International. 2016. p. 756-764