Tracing crowds in social media writing

Publikation: Konferencebidrag uden forlag/tidsskriftKonferenceabstrakt til konferenceForskningpeer review

Resumé

Social media stand accused of facilitating crowd-like behaviour, of sparking waves of angry messages in response to the latest media sensation instead of debate and critique. Such depictions draw on a distinction between publics and crowds, where publics are thought to be capable of reasoning, not least through the circulation of printed media, while crowds are understood in a derogatory sense as giving into affect and thus become easy targets for manipulation (Cody 2011, drawing on Tarde 1969[1901]). The new development brought about by the internet and social media is that crowds now seem to form not only through physical co-presence, but also in writing. For social research, this offers a chance to trace crowds in new ways and potentially come to question liberal assumptions about a clear distinction between publics and crowds. In this project, we attempt to trace and describe social media crowds in a massive data set consisting of Danish Facebook pages. First, we ask how crowds may be identified, and we experiment with different ways of locating imitation, drawing on Tarde’s idea that crowds are marked by a tendency towards homogeneity. Second, we ask what the implications are of tracing social media crowds: Are we crafting a detector of dynamics to be avoided in a liberal public sphere of rational debate, or are we perhaps rather discovering a contemporary version of the Cahiers de doléances – the descriptions of the grievances of ’the people’ collected right before the French Revolution – which may inform a more grounded understanding of the political terrain than the ’informed’ opinions and ’decent’ values of public debate (Latour 2017)?
OriginalsprogEngelsk
Publikationsdato2019
Antal sider1
StatusUdgivet - 2019
BegivenhedNordic STS 2019 - University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland
Varighed: 13 jun. 201914 jun. 2019
https://events.uta.fi/nordicsts2019/

Konference

KonferenceNordic STS 2019
LokationUniversity of Tampere
LandFinland
ByTampere
Periode13/06/201914/06/2019
Internetadresse

Fingerprint

social media
French revolution
facebook
accused
imitation
social research
manipulation
Internet
experiment
Values

Citer dette

Birkbak, A., & Munk, A. K. (2019). Tracing crowds in social media writing. Abstract fra Nordic STS 2019, Tampere, Finland.
Birkbak, Andreas ; Munk, Anders Kristian. / Tracing crowds in social media writing. Abstract fra Nordic STS 2019, Tampere, Finland.1 s.
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abstract = "Social media stand accused of facilitating crowd-like behaviour, of sparking waves of angry messages in response to the latest media sensation instead of debate and critique. Such depictions draw on a distinction between publics and crowds, where publics are thought to be capable of reasoning, not least through the circulation of printed media, while crowds are understood in a derogatory sense as giving into affect and thus become easy targets for manipulation (Cody 2011, drawing on Tarde 1969[1901]). The new development brought about by the internet and social media is that crowds now seem to form not only through physical co-presence, but also in writing. For social research, this offers a chance to trace crowds in new ways and potentially come to question liberal assumptions about a clear distinction between publics and crowds. In this project, we attempt to trace and describe social media crowds in a massive data set consisting of Danish Facebook pages. First, we ask how crowds may be identified, and we experiment with different ways of locating imitation, drawing on Tarde’s idea that crowds are marked by a tendency towards homogeneity. Second, we ask what the implications are of tracing social media crowds: Are we crafting a detector of dynamics to be avoided in a liberal public sphere of rational debate, or are we perhaps rather discovering a contemporary version of the Cahiers de dol{\'e}ances – the descriptions of the grievances of ’the people’ collected right before the French Revolution – which may inform a more grounded understanding of the political terrain than the ’informed’ opinions and ’decent’ values of public debate (Latour 2017)?",
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Birkbak, A & Munk, AK 2019, 'Tracing crowds in social media writing' Nordic STS 2019, Tampere, Finland, 13/06/2019 - 14/06/2019, .

Tracing crowds in social media writing. / Birkbak, Andreas; Munk, Anders Kristian.

2019. Abstract fra Nordic STS 2019, Tampere, Finland.

Publikation: Konferencebidrag uden forlag/tidsskriftKonferenceabstrakt til konferenceForskningpeer review

TY - ABST

T1 - Tracing crowds in social media writing

AU - Birkbak, Andreas

AU - Munk, Anders Kristian

PY - 2019

Y1 - 2019

N2 - Social media stand accused of facilitating crowd-like behaviour, of sparking waves of angry messages in response to the latest media sensation instead of debate and critique. Such depictions draw on a distinction between publics and crowds, where publics are thought to be capable of reasoning, not least through the circulation of printed media, while crowds are understood in a derogatory sense as giving into affect and thus become easy targets for manipulation (Cody 2011, drawing on Tarde 1969[1901]). The new development brought about by the internet and social media is that crowds now seem to form not only through physical co-presence, but also in writing. For social research, this offers a chance to trace crowds in new ways and potentially come to question liberal assumptions about a clear distinction between publics and crowds. In this project, we attempt to trace and describe social media crowds in a massive data set consisting of Danish Facebook pages. First, we ask how crowds may be identified, and we experiment with different ways of locating imitation, drawing on Tarde’s idea that crowds are marked by a tendency towards homogeneity. Second, we ask what the implications are of tracing social media crowds: Are we crafting a detector of dynamics to be avoided in a liberal public sphere of rational debate, or are we perhaps rather discovering a contemporary version of the Cahiers de doléances – the descriptions of the grievances of ’the people’ collected right before the French Revolution – which may inform a more grounded understanding of the political terrain than the ’informed’ opinions and ’decent’ values of public debate (Latour 2017)?

AB - Social media stand accused of facilitating crowd-like behaviour, of sparking waves of angry messages in response to the latest media sensation instead of debate and critique. Such depictions draw on a distinction between publics and crowds, where publics are thought to be capable of reasoning, not least through the circulation of printed media, while crowds are understood in a derogatory sense as giving into affect and thus become easy targets for manipulation (Cody 2011, drawing on Tarde 1969[1901]). The new development brought about by the internet and social media is that crowds now seem to form not only through physical co-presence, but also in writing. For social research, this offers a chance to trace crowds in new ways and potentially come to question liberal assumptions about a clear distinction between publics and crowds. In this project, we attempt to trace and describe social media crowds in a massive data set consisting of Danish Facebook pages. First, we ask how crowds may be identified, and we experiment with different ways of locating imitation, drawing on Tarde’s idea that crowds are marked by a tendency towards homogeneity. Second, we ask what the implications are of tracing social media crowds: Are we crafting a detector of dynamics to be avoided in a liberal public sphere of rational debate, or are we perhaps rather discovering a contemporary version of the Cahiers de doléances – the descriptions of the grievances of ’the people’ collected right before the French Revolution – which may inform a more grounded understanding of the political terrain than the ’informed’ opinions and ’decent’ values of public debate (Latour 2017)?

KW - social media

KW - crowds

KW - publics

KW - semantic analysis

KW - imitation

KW - Tarde

UR - https://events.uta.fi/nordicsts2019/abstracts-parallel-sessions-1-sts-and-social-media/

M3 - Conference abstract for conference

ER -

Birkbak A, Munk AK. Tracing crowds in social media writing. 2019. Abstract fra Nordic STS 2019, Tampere, Finland.