Becoming an Adoptive Parent: A Qualitative Analysis of the Experience of Prospective Intercountry Adopters

Research output: Contribution to conference without publisher/journalConference abstract for conferenceResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Our research approaches transnational adoption as a nexus of local and global practices which are mediated in talk, text and other modalities of discourse. We use mediated discourse analysis combined with virtual ethnography to understand the cross-cultural similarities and differences in transnational adoption practice and representation. We present the results of our analysis of how the experiences of adoptive parents are (re)mediated in a Danish television documentary series following five prospective adoptive couples, not all of whom succeed in their 'quest' to adopt from abroad. Furthermore, we trace how adopters publicly narrate their own experiences and problems with fertility and with adoption, as well as how they construct their personal websites, network with others locally and internationally, orient to other ‘sites’ or sources of information, share advice and create 'public goods'. We compare the websites of Danish adopters with those of adopters in Finland and the USA. Our aim is to better understand how discourses and contingent practices of care and 'kinning' are assembled in order to 'translate' a child from one familial 'place' or nexus of practice in the world to another, while crossing linguistic, sociocultural, kinship, racial, class and national boundaries in the process. By combining this qualitative approach with studies of governmentality we map out a set of analytical tools to examine the practices and micropolitics of adoptive parents and families, especially those practices which may precipitate a 'call for help' to distant actors, such as social welfare provision or counselling services.
Original languageEnglish
Publication date2006
Number of pages7
Publication statusPublished - 2006
EventSecond International Conference on Adoption Research, University of East Anglia - Norwich, United Kingdom
Duration: 17 Jul 200621 Jul 2006

Conference

ConferenceSecond International Conference on Adoption Research, University of East Anglia
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityNorwich
Period17/07/200621/07/2006

Fingerprint

adoptive parents
experience
website
micro-politics
discourse
governmentality
research approach
kinship
social welfare
discourse analysis
source of information
Finland
ethnography
counseling
fertility
television
linguistics

Keywords

  • Discourse
  • adoption
  • experience
  • documentary

Cite this

McIlvenny, P., & Raudaskoski, P. L. (2006). Becoming an Adoptive Parent: A Qualitative Analysis of the Experience of Prospective Intercountry Adopters. Abstract from Second International Conference on Adoption Research, University of East Anglia, Norwich, United Kingdom.
McIlvenny, Paul ; Raudaskoski, Pirkko Liisa. / Becoming an Adoptive Parent : A Qualitative Analysis of the Experience of Prospective Intercountry Adopters. Abstract from Second International Conference on Adoption Research, University of East Anglia, Norwich, United Kingdom.7 p.
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Becoming an Adoptive Parent : A Qualitative Analysis of the Experience of Prospective Intercountry Adopters. / McIlvenny, Paul; Raudaskoski, Pirkko Liisa.

2006. Abstract from Second International Conference on Adoption Research, University of East Anglia, Norwich, United Kingdom.

Research output: Contribution to conference without publisher/journalConference abstract for conferenceResearchpeer-review

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T1 - Becoming an Adoptive Parent

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N2 - Our research approaches transnational adoption as a nexus of local and global practices which are mediated in talk, text and other modalities of discourse. We use mediated discourse analysis combined with virtual ethnography to understand the cross-cultural similarities and differences in transnational adoption practice and representation. We present the results of our analysis of how the experiences of adoptive parents are (re)mediated in a Danish television documentary series following five prospective adoptive couples, not all of whom succeed in their 'quest' to adopt from abroad. Furthermore, we trace how adopters publicly narrate their own experiences and problems with fertility and with adoption, as well as how they construct their personal websites, network with others locally and internationally, orient to other ‘sites’ or sources of information, share advice and create 'public goods'. We compare the websites of Danish adopters with those of adopters in Finland and the USA. Our aim is to better understand how discourses and contingent practices of care and 'kinning' are assembled in order to 'translate' a child from one familial 'place' or nexus of practice in the world to another, while crossing linguistic, sociocultural, kinship, racial, class and national boundaries in the process. By combining this qualitative approach with studies of governmentality we map out a set of analytical tools to examine the practices and micropolitics of adoptive parents and families, especially those practices which may precipitate a 'call for help' to distant actors, such as social welfare provision or counselling services.

AB - Our research approaches transnational adoption as a nexus of local and global practices which are mediated in talk, text and other modalities of discourse. We use mediated discourse analysis combined with virtual ethnography to understand the cross-cultural similarities and differences in transnational adoption practice and representation. We present the results of our analysis of how the experiences of adoptive parents are (re)mediated in a Danish television documentary series following five prospective adoptive couples, not all of whom succeed in their 'quest' to adopt from abroad. Furthermore, we trace how adopters publicly narrate their own experiences and problems with fertility and with adoption, as well as how they construct their personal websites, network with others locally and internationally, orient to other ‘sites’ or sources of information, share advice and create 'public goods'. We compare the websites of Danish adopters with those of adopters in Finland and the USA. Our aim is to better understand how discourses and contingent practices of care and 'kinning' are assembled in order to 'translate' a child from one familial 'place' or nexus of practice in the world to another, while crossing linguistic, sociocultural, kinship, racial, class and national boundaries in the process. By combining this qualitative approach with studies of governmentality we map out a set of analytical tools to examine the practices and micropolitics of adoptive parents and families, especially those practices which may precipitate a 'call for help' to distant actors, such as social welfare provision or counselling services.

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McIlvenny P, Raudaskoski PL. Becoming an Adoptive Parent: A Qualitative Analysis of the Experience of Prospective Intercountry Adopters. 2006. Abstract from Second International Conference on Adoption Research, University of East Anglia, Norwich, United Kingdom.