The effect of a yellow bicycle jacket on cyclist accidents

Harry Lahrmann, Tanja Kidholm Osmann Madsen, Anne Vingaard Olesen, Jens Christian Overgaard Madsen, Tove Hels

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

7 Citations (Scopus)
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Abstract

This study is the first randomised controlled trial (RCT) of the safety effect of high-visibility bicycle clothing. The hypothesis was that the number of cyclist accidents can be reduced by increasing the visibility of the cyclists. The study design was an RCT with 6793 volunteer cyclists – 3402 test cyclists (with a yellow jacket) and 3391 control cyclists (without the jacket). The safety effect of the jacket was analysed by comparing the number of self-reported accidents for the two groups. The accident rate (AR) (accidents per person month) for personal injury accidents (PIAs) for the test group was 47% lower than that of the control group. For accidents involving cyclists and motor vehicles, it was 55% lower. The study was non-blinded, and the number of reported single accidents was significantly lower in the test group than in the control group. This is likely a result of a response bias, since the bicycle jacket was not expected to affect the number of single accidents. To compensate for this bias, a separate analysis was carried out. This analysis reduced the effect of the jacket from 47% to 38%.

Original languageEnglish
JournalSafety Science
Volume108
Pages (from-to)209-217
Number of pages9
ISSN0925-7535
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2018

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Wasps
Bicycles
bicycle
Accidents
accident
Group
Visibility
Randomized Controlled Trials
Safety
Control Groups
Clothing
Motor Vehicles
trend
clothing
motor vehicle
Volunteers
human being
Wounds and Injuries

Keywords

  • Bicycles
  • Traffic safety
  • Safety effect
  • Self-reported accidents
  • Visibility
  • Clothes

Cite this

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title = "The effect of a yellow bicycle jacket on cyclist accidents",
abstract = "This study is the first randomised controlled trial (RCT) of the safety effect of high-visibility bicycle clothing. The hypothesis was that the number of cyclist accidents can be reduced by increasing the visibility of the cyclists. The study design was an RCT with 6793 volunteer cyclists – 3402 test cyclists (with a yellow jacket) and 3391 control cyclists (without the jacket). The safety effect of the jacket was analysed by comparing the number of self-reported accidents for the two groups. The accident rate (AR) (accidents per person month) for personal injury accidents (PIAs) for the test group was 47{\%} lower than that of the control group. For accidents involving cyclists and motor vehicles, it was 55{\%} lower. The study was non-blinded, and the number of reported single accidents was significantly lower in the test group than in the control group. This is likely a result of a response bias, since the bicycle jacket was not expected to affect the number of single accidents. To compensate for this bias, a separate analysis was carried out. This analysis reduced the effect of the jacket from 47{\%} to 38{\%}.",
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The effect of a yellow bicycle jacket on cyclist accidents. / Lahrmann, Harry; Madsen, Tanja Kidholm Osmann; Olesen, Anne Vingaard; Madsen, Jens Christian Overgaard; Hels, Tove.

In: Safety Science, Vol. 108, 01.10.2018, p. 209-217.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

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