Understanding the adoption of TELEs: the importance of management

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearch

Abstract

For a TELE to become adopted by the vast majority of individual learners as a tool for learning, adoption at the institutional level must be considered, because the vast majority of a population of technology users depends on external stimuli to adopt the technology. This article analyses a case where a social simulation game, a prize-winning e-learning product, which is based on theory of, and dedicated to, self-regulated learning - in other words, a product predestined to succeed in supporting self-regulated learning - was implemented for training in academic information literacy. Applying a systemic, Bateson-inspired, understanding of learning and based on data from observation, qualitative interviews, and surveys, a number of barriers to adoption at the organisational level are identified, all requiring management initiatives if the application is to fully unfold its potential.

Original languageEnglish
JournalEuropean Journal of Education
Volume41
Issue number3-4
Pages (from-to)509–519
ISSN0141-8211
Publication statusPublished - 2006

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management
learning
qualitative interview
electronic learning
stimulus
literacy
simulation

Cite this

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title = "Understanding the adoption of TELEs: the importance of management",
abstract = "For a TELE to become adopted by the vast majority of individual learners as a tool for learning, adoption at the institutional level must be considered, because the vast majority of a population of technology users depends on external stimuli to adopt the technology. This article analyses a case where a social simulation game, a prize-winning e-learning product, which is based on theory of, and dedicated to, self-regulated learning - in other words, a product predestined to succeed in supporting self-regulated learning - was implemented for training in academic information literacy. Applying a systemic, Bateson-inspired, understanding of learning and based on data from observation, qualitative interviews, and surveys, a number of barriers to adoption at the organisational level are identified, all requiring management initiatives if the application is to fully unfold its potential.",
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Understanding the adoption of TELEs : the importance of management. / Christiansen, Ellen; Nyvang, Tom.

In: European Journal of Education, Vol. 41, No. 3-4, 2006, p. 509–519.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearch

TY - JOUR

T1 - Understanding the adoption of TELEs

T2 - the importance of management

AU - Christiansen, Ellen

AU - Nyvang, Tom

N1 - online tidsskrift

PY - 2006

Y1 - 2006

N2 - For a TELE to become adopted by the vast majority of individual learners as a tool for learning, adoption at the institutional level must be considered, because the vast majority of a population of technology users depends on external stimuli to adopt the technology. This article analyses a case where a social simulation game, a prize-winning e-learning product, which is based on theory of, and dedicated to, self-regulated learning - in other words, a product predestined to succeed in supporting self-regulated learning - was implemented for training in academic information literacy. Applying a systemic, Bateson-inspired, understanding of learning and based on data from observation, qualitative interviews, and surveys, a number of barriers to adoption at the organisational level are identified, all requiring management initiatives if the application is to fully unfold its potential.

AB - For a TELE to become adopted by the vast majority of individual learners as a tool for learning, adoption at the institutional level must be considered, because the vast majority of a population of technology users depends on external stimuli to adopt the technology. This article analyses a case where a social simulation game, a prize-winning e-learning product, which is based on theory of, and dedicated to, self-regulated learning - in other words, a product predestined to succeed in supporting self-regulated learning - was implemented for training in academic information literacy. Applying a systemic, Bateson-inspired, understanding of learning and based on data from observation, qualitative interviews, and surveys, a number of barriers to adoption at the organisational level are identified, all requiring management initiatives if the application is to fully unfold its potential.

M3 - Journal article

VL - 41

SP - 509

EP - 519

JO - European Journal of Education

JF - European Journal of Education

SN - 0141-8211

IS - 3-4

ER -