Early stages of agglomeration of adhesive particles in fully-developed turbulent pipe flows

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Resumé

We study how changes in particle response time and adhesiveness affect particles agglomeration in fully-developed turbulent pipe flows. For this purpose, particle-particle and particle-wall interactions are fully-resolved using the soft-sphere Discrete Element Method (DEM) modified to include adhesiveness due to van der Waals forces and electrostatic forces through JKR theory. The particulate phase is two-way coupled to the turbulent fluid phase, which is partly resolved using Large Eddy Simulations (LES). First, we validate the simulations by grid refinement and by comparing the statistics of the flow field to experiments in literature. Secondly, we vary the particle response time τ ppd p 2/(18μ) and observe the largest agglomerates in terms of average number of particles per agglomerate to be formed by primary particles with intermediate Stokes numbers, e.g. St epe≈6.4 where τ e=D/U is the eddy-turn over time or St LpL≈46.4 in terms of the integral time scale of the turbulent flow τ L. Then we show how the total fraction of particles contained in agglomerates is almost constant up to St e=6.4 after which there is a sudden drop in the fraction of particles contained in agglomerates. To investigate the transition from non-adhesive particles to highly adhesive particles, we vary the adhesiveness parameter Ad=γ/(ρ pU 2d p) to obtain particles that vary from non-adhesive particles where no agglomerates are formed to highly adhesive particles where more than 70% are contained in agglomerates. While varying the adhesiveness of the primary particles for a fixed particle response time, we observe three distinct regimes. For almost non-adhesive particles, the agglomerate number density is highest towards the centre of the pipe with a maximum at 0.2 < r/R < 0.3. Slightly more adhesive particles form an almost uniform agglomerate number density profile, while for highly adhesive particles there is a distinct peak in agglomerate number density at the wall where particles and agglomerates deposit.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftInternational Journal of Multiphase Flow
Vol/bind106
Sider (fra-til)254-267
Antal sider14
ISSN0301-9322
DOI
StatusUdgivet - sep. 2018

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pipe flow
Pipe flow
agglomeration
adhesives
Adhesives
Agglomeration
Van der Waals forces
Electrostatic force
Large eddy simulation
Finite difference method
Turbulent flow
Flow fields
Deposits
Pipe
Statistics
Fluids
Experiments

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title = "Early stages of agglomeration of adhesive particles in fully-developed turbulent pipe flows",
abstract = "We study how changes in particle response time and adhesiveness affect particles agglomeration in fully-developed turbulent pipe flows. For this purpose, particle-particle and particle-wall interactions are fully-resolved using the soft-sphere Discrete Element Method (DEM) modified to include adhesiveness due to van der Waals forces and electrostatic forces through JKR theory. The particulate phase is two-way coupled to the turbulent fluid phase, which is partly resolved using Large Eddy Simulations (LES). First, we validate the simulations by grid refinement and by comparing the statistics of the flow field to experiments in literature. Secondly, we vary the particle response time τ p=ρ pd p 2/(18μ) and observe the largest agglomerates in terms of average number of particles per agglomerate to be formed by primary particles with intermediate Stokes numbers, e.g. St e=τ p/τ e≈6.4 where τ e=D/U is the eddy-turn over time or St L=τ p/τ L≈46.4 in terms of the integral time scale of the turbulent flow τ L. Then we show how the total fraction of particles contained in agglomerates is almost constant up to St e=6.4 after which there is a sudden drop in the fraction of particles contained in agglomerates. To investigate the transition from non-adhesive particles to highly adhesive particles, we vary the adhesiveness parameter Ad=γ/(ρ pU 2d p) to obtain particles that vary from non-adhesive particles where no agglomerates are formed to highly adhesive particles where more than 70{\%} are contained in agglomerates. While varying the adhesiveness of the primary particles for a fixed particle response time, we observe three distinct regimes. For almost non-adhesive particles, the agglomerate number density is highest towards the centre of the pipe with a maximum at 0.2 < r/R < 0.3. Slightly more adhesive particles form an almost uniform agglomerate number density profile, while for highly adhesive particles there is a distinct peak in agglomerate number density at the wall where particles and agglomerates deposit.",
keywords = "Adhesive particles, Agglomeration, Turbulent pipe flow, Large Eddy Simulation (LES), Soft-sphere Discrete Element Method (DEM), Johnson-Kendall-Roberts (JKR) model",
author = "Jakob H{\ae}rvig and Kim S{\o}rensen and Condra, {Thomas Joseph}",
year = "2018",
month = "9",
doi = "10.1016/j.ijmultiphaseflow.2018.04.017",
language = "English",
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pages = "254--267",
journal = "International Journal of Multiphase Flow",
issn = "0301-9322",
publisher = "Pergamon Press",

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Early stages of agglomeration of adhesive particles in fully-developed turbulent pipe flows. / Hærvig, Jakob; Sørensen, Kim; Condra, Thomas Joseph.

I: International Journal of Multiphase Flow, Bind 106, 09.2018, s. 254-267.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Early stages of agglomeration of adhesive particles in fully-developed turbulent pipe flows

AU - Hærvig, Jakob

AU - Sørensen, Kim

AU - Condra, Thomas Joseph

PY - 2018/9

Y1 - 2018/9

N2 - We study how changes in particle response time and adhesiveness affect particles agglomeration in fully-developed turbulent pipe flows. For this purpose, particle-particle and particle-wall interactions are fully-resolved using the soft-sphere Discrete Element Method (DEM) modified to include adhesiveness due to van der Waals forces and electrostatic forces through JKR theory. The particulate phase is two-way coupled to the turbulent fluid phase, which is partly resolved using Large Eddy Simulations (LES). First, we validate the simulations by grid refinement and by comparing the statistics of the flow field to experiments in literature. Secondly, we vary the particle response time τ p=ρ pd p 2/(18μ) and observe the largest agglomerates in terms of average number of particles per agglomerate to be formed by primary particles with intermediate Stokes numbers, e.g. St e=τ p/τ e≈6.4 where τ e=D/U is the eddy-turn over time or St L=τ p/τ L≈46.4 in terms of the integral time scale of the turbulent flow τ L. Then we show how the total fraction of particles contained in agglomerates is almost constant up to St e=6.4 after which there is a sudden drop in the fraction of particles contained in agglomerates. To investigate the transition from non-adhesive particles to highly adhesive particles, we vary the adhesiveness parameter Ad=γ/(ρ pU 2d p) to obtain particles that vary from non-adhesive particles where no agglomerates are formed to highly adhesive particles where more than 70% are contained in agglomerates. While varying the adhesiveness of the primary particles for a fixed particle response time, we observe three distinct regimes. For almost non-adhesive particles, the agglomerate number density is highest towards the centre of the pipe with a maximum at 0.2 < r/R < 0.3. Slightly more adhesive particles form an almost uniform agglomerate number density profile, while for highly adhesive particles there is a distinct peak in agglomerate number density at the wall where particles and agglomerates deposit.

AB - We study how changes in particle response time and adhesiveness affect particles agglomeration in fully-developed turbulent pipe flows. For this purpose, particle-particle and particle-wall interactions are fully-resolved using the soft-sphere Discrete Element Method (DEM) modified to include adhesiveness due to van der Waals forces and electrostatic forces through JKR theory. The particulate phase is two-way coupled to the turbulent fluid phase, which is partly resolved using Large Eddy Simulations (LES). First, we validate the simulations by grid refinement and by comparing the statistics of the flow field to experiments in literature. Secondly, we vary the particle response time τ p=ρ pd p 2/(18μ) and observe the largest agglomerates in terms of average number of particles per agglomerate to be formed by primary particles with intermediate Stokes numbers, e.g. St e=τ p/τ e≈6.4 where τ e=D/U is the eddy-turn over time or St L=τ p/τ L≈46.4 in terms of the integral time scale of the turbulent flow τ L. Then we show how the total fraction of particles contained in agglomerates is almost constant up to St e=6.4 after which there is a sudden drop in the fraction of particles contained in agglomerates. To investigate the transition from non-adhesive particles to highly adhesive particles, we vary the adhesiveness parameter Ad=γ/(ρ pU 2d p) to obtain particles that vary from non-adhesive particles where no agglomerates are formed to highly adhesive particles where more than 70% are contained in agglomerates. While varying the adhesiveness of the primary particles for a fixed particle response time, we observe three distinct regimes. For almost non-adhesive particles, the agglomerate number density is highest towards the centre of the pipe with a maximum at 0.2 < r/R < 0.3. Slightly more adhesive particles form an almost uniform agglomerate number density profile, while for highly adhesive particles there is a distinct peak in agglomerate number density at the wall where particles and agglomerates deposit.

KW - Adhesive particles

KW - Agglomeration

KW - Turbulent pipe flow

KW - Large Eddy Simulation (LES)

KW - Soft-sphere Discrete Element Method (DEM)

KW - Johnson-Kendall-Roberts (JKR) model

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U2 - 10.1016/j.ijmultiphaseflow.2018.04.017

DO - 10.1016/j.ijmultiphaseflow.2018.04.017

M3 - Journal article

VL - 106

SP - 254

EP - 267

JO - International Journal of Multiphase Flow

JF - International Journal of Multiphase Flow

SN - 0301-9322

ER -