The future of ‘video’ in video-based qualitative research is not ‘dumb’ flat pixels! Exploring volumetric performance capture and immersive performative replay

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Resumé

Qualitative research that focuses on social interaction and talk has been increasingly based, for good reason, on collections of audiovisual
recordings in which 2D flat-screen video and mono/stereo audio are the dominant recording media. This paper argues that the future of ‘video’ in video-based qualitative studies will move away from ‘dumb’ flat pixels in a 2D screen. Instead, volumetric performance capture and immersive performative replay relies on a procedural camera/spectator-independent representation of a dynamic real or virtual volumetric space over time. It affords analytical practices of re-enactment – shadowing or redoing modes of seeing/listening as an active spectator for “another next first time” – which play on the tense relationships between live performance, observability, spectatorship and documentation. Three examples illustrate how naturally occurring social interaction and settings can be captured volumetrically and re-enacted immersively in virtual reality (VR), and what this means for data integrity, evidential adequacy and qualitative analysis.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftQualitative Research
ISSN1468-7941
StatusAccepteret/In press - 1 jan. 2020

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qualitative research
video
spectator
performance
interaction
research focus
virtual reality
documentation
integrity
recording
Social Interaction
Spectator
Qualitative Research
Procedural
Observability
Integrity
Spectatorship
Evidentials
Adequacy
Re-enactment

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abstract = "Qualitative research that focuses on social interaction and talk has been increasingly based, for good reason, on collections of audiovisualrecordings in which 2D flat-screen video and mono/stereo audio are the dominant recording media. This paper argues that the future of ‘video’ in video-based qualitative studies will move away from ‘dumb’ flat pixels in a 2D screen. Instead, volumetric performance capture and immersive performative replay relies on a procedural camera/spectator-independent representation of a dynamic real or virtual volumetric space over time. It affords analytical practices of re-enactment – shadowing or redoing modes of seeing/listening as an active spectator for “another next first time” – which play on the tense relationships between live performance, observability, spectatorship and documentation. Three examples illustrate how naturally occurring social interaction and settings can be captured volumetrically and re-enacted immersively in virtual reality (VR), and what this means for data integrity, evidential adequacy and qualitative analysis.",
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